Confinement in Caesarea — Teaching Plan

Key Thought:  Paul defends himself and his faith before three groups of people.  We can learn from this how we might stand up for ourselves and our beliefs.

Lesson 12, September 22, 2018

1. Have a volunteer read Acts 24:10-19.

Image © Pacific Press from GoodSalt.com

Image © Pacific Press from GoodSalt.com

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what is the most important point in this text.
  2. How did Paul answer the governor’s question?
  3. Personal Application: What is a conscience void of offense toward men?  Can you say the same thing if questioned in a court of law?  Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study:  One of your relatives states: “Paul didn’t do anything that violated government or church law, but they accused him anyway because of his religious beliefs. Could we be falsely accused of wrongdoing because we honor God’s Sabbath?” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read, Acts 25:8-12.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. What was the ultimate motive for the Jews to want Paul tried in Jerusalem before the Sanhedran Council?
  3. Personal Application: Would it be better to be tried before religious leaders or in front of a secular court if falsely accused? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study:  One of your friends states, “Why did Paul appeal to Caesar knowing that Festus was corrupt, the Roman government was in power over the Jews in slavery, and knowing he would probably die?” How would you reply to your friend?

3. Have a volunteer read Acts 25:19-27.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. What did Festus say about Paul and his accusers and the situation he faced?
  3. Personal Application: What does this tell us about how outward appearances can be deceptive about the reality behind the appearance? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your neighbors states, “Why did Paul add his personal testimony to his defense? Was he more interested in saving souls than his own life and well-being?” How would you respond to your neighbor?

4. Have a volunteer read Acts 26:27-29.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. Paul appealed to the king. But Agrippa said, “You almost persuade me to be a Christian.” How many people have you “almost persuaded” to be a Christian?
  3. Personal Application: What are some of the reasons that people that are convicted of truth use to not take that step in joining the church? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study:  Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.” Ministry of Healing, p. 148.

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Source: Daily Sabbath School Lessons